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Poems by Emily Dickinson

Table of Contents


This is my letter to the world,
That never wrote to me, --
The simple news that Nature told,
With tender majesty.

Her message is committed
To hands I cannot see;
For love of her, sweet countrymen,
Judge tenderly of me!

I. LIFE.

I. SUCCESS. Success is counted sweetest

II. Our share of night to bear,

III. ROUGE ET NOIR. Soul, wilt thou toss again?

IV. ROUGE GAGNE. 'T is so much joy! 'T is so much joy!

V. Glee! The great storm is over!

VI. If I can stop one heart from breaking,

VII. ALMOST! Within my reach!

VIII. A wounded deer leaps highest,

IX. The heart asks pleasure first,

X. IN A LIBRARY. A precious, mouldering pleasure 't is

XI. Much madness is divinest sense

XII. I asked no other thing,

XIII. EXCLUSION. The soul selects her own society,

XIV. THE SECRET. Some things that fly there be, --

XV. THE LONELY HOUSE. I know some lonely houses off the road

XVI. To fight aloud is very brave,

XVII. DAWN. When night is almost done,

XVIII. THE BOOK OF MARTYRS. Read, sweet, how others strove,

XIX. THE MYSTERY OF PAIN. Pain has an element of blank;

XX. I taste a liquor never brewed,

XXI. A BOOK. He ate and drank the precious words,

XXII. I had no time to hate, because

XXIII. UNRETURNING. 'T was such a little, little boat

XXIV. Whether my bark went down at sea,

XXV. Belshazzar had a letter, --

XXVI. The brain within its groove

II. LOVE.

I. MINE. Mine by the right of the white election!

II. BEQUEST. You left me, sweet, two legacies, --

III. Alter? When the hills do.

IV. SUSPENSE. Elysium is as far as to

V. SURRENDER. Doubt me, my dim companion!

VI. IF you were coming in the fall,

VII. WITH A FLOWER. I hide myself within my flower,

VIII. PROOF. That I did always love,

IX. Have you got a brook in your little heart,

X. TRANSPLANTED. As if some little Arctic flower,

XI. THE OUTLET. My river runs to thee:

XII. IN VAIN. I CANNOT live with you,

XIII. RENUNCIATION. There came a day at summer's full

XIV. LOVE'S BAPTISM. I'm ceded, I've stopped being theirs;

XV. RESURRECTION. 'T was a long parting, but the time

XVI. APOCALYPSE. I'm wife; I've finished that,

XVII. THE WIFE. She rose to his requirement, dropped

XVIII. APOTHEOSIS. Come slowly, Eden!

III. NATURE.

I. New feet within my garden go,

II. MAY-FLOWER. Pink, small, and punctual,

III. WHY? THE murmur of a bee

IV. Perhaps you'd like to buy a flower?

V. The pedigree of honey

VI. A SERVICE OF SONG. Some keep the Sabbath going to church;

VII. The bee is not afraid of me,

VIII. SUMMER'S ARMIES. Some rainbow coming from the fair!

IX. THE GRASS. The grass so little has to do, --

X. A little road not made of man,

XI. SUMMER SHOWER. A drop fell on the apple tree,

XII. PSALM OF THE DAY. A something in a summer's day,

XIII. THE SEA OF SUNSET. This is the land the sunset washes,

XIV. PURPLE CLOVER. There is a flower that bees prefer,

XV. THE BEE. Like trains of cars on tracks of plush

XVI. Presentiment is that long shadow on the lawn

XVII. As children bid the guest good-night,

XVIII. ngels in the early morning

XIX. So bashful when I spied her,

XX. TWO WORLDS. It makes no difference abroad,

XXI. THE MOUNTAIN. The mountain sat upon the plain

XXII. A DAY. I'll tell you how the sun rose, --

XXIII. The butterfiy's assumption-gown,

XXIV. THE WIND. Of all the sounds despatched abroad,

XXV. DEATH AND LIFE. Apparently with no surprise

XXVI. 'T WAS later when the summer went

XXVII. INDIAN SUMMER. These are the days when birds come back,

XXVIII. AUTUMN. The morns are meeker than they were,

XXIX. BECLOUDED. The sky is low, the clouds are mean,

XXX. THE HEMLOCK. I think the hemlock likes to stand

XXXI. There's a certain slant of light,

IV. TIME AND ETERNITY.

I. One dignity delays for all,

II. TOO LATE. Delayed till she had ceased to know,

III. ASTRA CASTRA. Departed to the judgment,

IV. Safe in their alabaster chambers,

V. On this long storm the rainbow rose,

VI. FROM THE CHRYSALIS. My cocoon tightens, colors tease,

VII. SETTING SAIL. Exultation is the going

VIII. Look back on time with kindly eyes,

IX. A train went through a burial gate,

X. I died for beauty, but was scarce

XI. "TROUBLED ABOUT MANY THINGS." How many times these low feet staggered,

XII. REAL. I like a look of agony,

XIII. THE FUNERAL. That short, potential stir

XIV. I went to thank her,

XV. I've seen a dying eye

XVI. REFUGE. The clouds their backs together laid,

XVII. I never saw a moor,

XVIII. PLAYMATES. God permits industrious angels

XIX. To know just how he suffered would be dear;

XX. The last night that she lived,

XXI. THE FIRST LESSON. Not in this world to see his face

XXII. The bustle in a house

XXIII. I reason, earth is short,

XXIV. Afraid? Of whom am I afraid?

XXV. DYING. The sun kept setting, setting still;

XXVI. Two swimmers wrestled on the spar

XXVII. THE CHARIOT. Because I could not stop for Death,

XXVIII. She went as quiet as the dew

XXIX. RESURGAM. At last to be identified!

XXX. Except to heaven, she is nought;

XXXI. Death is a dialogue between

XXXII. It was too late for man,

XXXIII. ALONG THE POTOMAC. When I was small, a woman died.

XXXIV. The daisy follows soft the sun,

XXXV. EMANCIPATION. No rack can torture me,

XXXVI. LOST. I lost a world the other day.

XXXVII. If I shouldn't be alive

XXXVIII. Sleep is supposed to be,

XXXIX. I shall know why, when time is over,

XL. I never lost as much but twice,